Human Factors Minute is now available on Spotify: Check it out here!
Oct. 14, 2022

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Recap + Podcast Announcement | #HFES2022 | Bonus Episode


Recorded in front of a LIVE studio audience on October 11th, 2022, in Atlanta Georgia. Hosted by Nick Roome and Barry Kirby.

On this bonus conference coverage episode of Human Factors Cast we recap our livestream coverage of the 66th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting (#HFES2022) and we also talk about an exciting announcement regarding the future of the podcast. This last hour of our livestream turned chaotic and required a lot of editing. We hope you enjoy our coverage from the event!

This episode is part of our #HFES2022 live coverage. The other episodes as well as the full live stream can be found here:

 

Follow us:

 

Thank you to our Human Factors Cast Honorary Staff Patreons: 

  • Michelle Tripp

 

Support us:

 

Human Factors Cast Socials:

 

Reference:

 

Feedback:

 

Disclaimer: Human Factors Cast may earn an affiliate commission when you buy through the links here.

Mentioned in this episode:

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

Listen here: https://www.1202podcast.com

Let us know what you want to hear about next week!

Follow us:

Thank you to our Human Factors Cast Honorary Staff Patreons: 

  • Michelle Tripp

Support us:

Human Factors Cast Socials:

Reference:

Feedback:

  • Have something you would like to share with us? (Feedback or news):

 

Disclaimer: Human Factors Cast may earn an affiliate commission when you buy through the links here.

Transcript

 

Atlanta, a hub for human factors activity. Companies like Delta, CNN, the CVC, Amazon, and Wayfare are employing human factors practitioners to solve the world's problems. If you ever wondered why we can do tasks when we have the tools we need, or how having the right tools can make you more efficient, you've come to the right place. Human Factors focuses on both the why and how of human ability, efficiency, limitations, and systems. Human Factors provides us a way of improving the human experience that brings us here. The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society's 66th annual meeting topics discussed here this week will span a variety of domains, such as improving emergency response to safety, all the way to improving musculoskeletal issues the average workforce faces, in addition to many more. But that's just scratching the surface. The HFES Annual Meeting is the premier conference where professionals in the human factors field come together with a goal of discovery, exchange, and advocacy of human interactions with the world around them. During our conference coverage today, you'll be hearing from world leaders in education, government and industry who are focused and committed to improving our daily interactions with everything we come into contact with. Let's get started. Hello, HFES, yes. People are looking at me like a crazy person because we are broadcasting live here from Hfes'sixty 6th Annual Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. We are recording this live episode Recap, on October 11, 2022. That's Tuesday. It's the first day of the conference. My name is Nick Rome. We got a great show for you. We're going to be breaking down a lot of all things HFPS, everything HFPS we talked about. We had a big, long livestream. We are here kind of recording the Recap. I would love to take credit for all this myself, but I can't do this alone. I have remoting in from the UK. Mr. Barry Kirby. Barry. Hey there, Nick. And it's been fantastic here to be able to remote in with you for the past nearly nine and a half hours now. I think this is the closest we've been. This is certainly the longest you and I have ever talked in one continuous setting. Now, I got to say, we tend to get a lot of new folks listening to the show around this time. So thank you so much. Welcome to the show. Sincerely thank you for even picking out your phone and putting in Human Factors cast and subscribing and doing all that. Thank you. That is awesome. I'm so glad you're here. This is a little bit different from the normal program, normal format that we do, but we also do conference coverage and that's why we're here. We are here live well, I am here live in Atlanta, Georgia. HF, yes, we're going to be talking all things Human Factors in Economics society. I keep mentioning this over and over and over. It's been a long day. I'm sleep deprived. This is it. This is the last thing we're recording and then I can go back to my room and sleep. But some of the stuff that we're going to go over today is a little bit about what HFPS is. Even if you may be familiar with it, it's always nice to get a refresher. We're going to talk about some of our coverage and some of the best, most fun topics that we had today. And then we'll kind of wrap it up and call it a day. So, Barry, I got to get into things here, since you have you've never been to HIFs, right? No, never been. This is my first time. Even though Tony remotely tell me what HF yes. Is. HFS is the Human Factors and Ergonomic Society and it was founded in 1957. OK. Give me your perception of what HFES is. Yeah, it's just another professional organization for human factors practitioners. It's nearly as good as the charitations of economics and human factors, but you've got a lot to learn now. It's been a really interesting view on seeing a community come together and obviously I've had a quite a privilege of you on HFPS across the board, being able to get to speak to the leadership today and what their ambitions are and that type of thing, as well as talking to general members. But it seems from the outside, a very now open and progressive organization that's coordinating itself around not only just doing human factors well, but communicating it in hopefully more inclusive way. Yes, I agree. That's it no, I think for me, HFPS is a professional home. It was the first sort of major conference that I went to, met a lot of really great connections. And over the years, our connection here as a podcast has grown to the point where now we're in the ear of HFPS leadership and that's always nice to have. But beyond that, some of the folks here that make this thing happen is just they're on it. And so I always get a little when people say that the society is dying. Yes, it needs to change. But a lot of our stuff today talked about what changes are coming and truthfully, they've left me pretty hopeful for the future of the society. So let's get into our well, first off, let's just address the elephant in the room. We're here. I'm physically here at HFS. It's been three years. Four years. Three years. Four years. Three years. For me, that's greater than two. Yes.

 

 

In the past it's been very much like this, although I feel that the energy is much higher. And I can't tell if that's because people have been stopping by and saying hi to the podcast all day. Or if it's just genuinely everybody is here and excited about getting back into things. Because over the last couple of years. It's been a hybrid variant where either there's been a limited number of people there or it's been completely online just because of the way the world was over the last couple of years. So with that being said, Barry, walk us through what did we hear about today? So I guess if we look in the grandkids things, we were privileged, I think, to be able to live stream the plenary remarks made by Chris's outgoing president and Carolyn. But then also we heard from the keynote speaker, from Test, back from Boeing, who basically was a really good insight into what it means to him to have more human factors involvement, which was fantastic. Yeah. Craig Bombing, thank you very much for the nightcare. So we've had that and then we've had a day of interviews, literally nonstop interviews all the way through, including HFPS leadership. And then we've had a really good insight into affinity groups today. No doubt we'll come and talk to you about them in a bit more detail. And that's been an eye of the experience for me, as well as a human practice practitioner thinking, I think we automatically assume that we as human practice practitioners would take into account all the different types of people, the different types of attitudes and desires within our society. And we just thought, proves that we need these affinity groups to keep our eyes open. We talked a lot about autonomy. Seems to have been a better persistent theme, not only with people who have spoken to us, but people who have been reflecting on what they've been seeing and then talking about leadership communications. So there's been a real run through. I think possibly one of the highlights is talking about the outfit that Chris Reed was wearing last night, the smooth suit. But no, it's been refreshing, I think. So I think we'll dig more into this. But a persistent theme, particularly from the leadership for me was around change, around maybe around not so much where we are now, but where we see in the future, in fact, very much almost fighting talk from the current leadership trio. I want to add a quick little note to that, too, is because it's not only looking forward, you might say, well, you're ignoring what's happening now, but no, that forward looking is because of what we understand now. And like you said, it's really refreshing. It's fighting talk and fighting words. They want to get in there and get their hands dirty and do things. Yes, very much so. I don't know, do we want to dig into a few of the specifics? I mean, let's talk about the leads a bit more detail, because I thought that was really we heard from Chris and county twice, both from their official remarks to the conference itself, and then the officer came and spoke to us, as Susan did as well. I mean, Chris, I think, was very open with us when he came and spoke to us earlier. He really feels that he's not only done something, but he's been able to lay a framework down lay a direction and a level of momentum that he feels that everybody is bought into and everybody's moving on. His initial slides is discussed at the conference, really looked at the he talked about, as you mentioned, around the membership numbers, really is the sunsetting on HFS, and I think it was quite clear that he doesn't think that's the case. You continue on. I have something I have to take care of in person really quick. Okay, you continue on. I absolutely will, because I quite like the sound of my own voice. Anyway, it was really interesting to hear Chris approach, and also, I'd encourage you to go back and listen to what he said in a lot more detail, because I guess one of the questions that we asked him is, right, so what's your legacy? What is it that you think that we really strongly say? It's not over yet. We're only getting started. And then when we spoke to Carolyn, there was very much that there was a sort of continuation. There's not going to be a massive step change moving into a very different direction. Now, Carolyn very much had the words that the ideas that she wants to bring, but it's all still very much in that direction of wanting to do more outreach, wanting to work with people, wanting to drive forward. And then we heard from Susan for the incoming president elect, she very clearly had a whole bunch of things that she wanted to change, some large, some small. But all throughout all three of them, there was no there was a level of synergy in terms of direction, and that direction is progressive. It is moving forward. It is evolving the organization to be different from where it is, to go somewhere else. But it is very much of the everyone's going to bring their own flavor to it. Chris had his flavor that he bought to it and has clearly done made some real impact. One of the profound things that he said to us was that he felt that people just didn't realize that HFS was potentially broken, and we were just working through that. But now he feels that it was the elephant in the room, and that helps of it. So between Chris, Carolyn, and Susan, that progressive way forward is going to see HFS change and morph and grow into a different beast with the one that perhaps suited members a bit more than members of the future, rather than just purely the members of the past. We heard a lot more about different ways of doing communications as well. And actually look at the conference itself, there was clearly different ideas about wanting to change the way that the conference ran. So a really obvious reflection, that was where they did the awards. So the awards ceremony moved to last night, which is the first apparently apparently would normally be done on the Tuesday morning rather than the Monday night. But they did it on the Monday night to bring it in with the welcome dinner. And then they were very gleefully telling me that they had music and all like nice drinks and great food, which left my mouth watering and really quite upset that I'd missed a lot of this specific. Hold on, hold on. We have a rare opportunity here. I've set up a camera for folks to come by and to give their thoughts. Give me 1 minute here, I'll get the camera up. Yes. Could you just give us a couple of thoughts? Say hello to the camera. You're live to everybody. Could you just let us know sort of what you enjoyed about HFPS today and what you're looking forward to this week? Absolutely. So I'm Julie Gilbert. McMan. I'm the incoming Secretary Treasurer Elect for HFS. And I have enjoyed all of these amazing young people who are here. The energy is just incredible, and listening to the different work that they're doing and their aspirations has just been a joy. And I'm getting ready to go up and go to the student reception and say hello to them at I think it's at 6th. And the early career and practitioner reception is coming up at 530 up on Skyline, which is the 10th floor, which isn't advertised well. So if you want to come up there, I don't care who you are, come up there, say hi, grab something to eat and make some connections, because that's what HFDs is all about, is sharing knowledge, sharing of the science and making connections that you can have for the rest of your life. That's it. Well, that was awesome. Great to hear from some people who are live attending and just getting that feedback. Well captured, Nick. That's good work. Yeah, I have to let everybody know this is a live stream. This is completely unplanned. And I had planned on releasing this as an episode. I don't know if I want to do that now. We'll kind of package this up. Hang on, we have another one, maybe potentially. Are you ready? You want to talk? Yeah. Here. Hang on. Barry, give me some preamble here while I get this ready. Okay. So the other person who I spoke to, who I thought was mind blowing in many ways was Professor Paul Salmon. Paul is something who I've spoken to before on a number of occasions, but actually on the top of the podcast and when I spoke to him and he's got quite well published on this, he's really looking to artificial General intelligence and specifically the moment around associated risks. You're talking about AI and AGI is something that we do quite often now. Artificial intelligence is baked into everything. But actually he came up with some concepts today that were really, really weird for me. One of the things that really blew my mind was the idea around where Paul mentioned that artificial General intelligence, when they're working with us, may not actually want us to know us as humans, that they are more intelligent than we are. And so the AGI might hold that was just mind blowing. The other thing that Paul did as well was away from the AGI. Scary Mercer, with some of this actually just focused on that a little bit more, was what they were doing. It was coming up with two different models, a military model and a transport model, to test AGI and make that work. And actually, some of the stuff that was interesting was more of the risks were on the civilian application. So the transport application rather than the military application, it was almost a given that the military application would do what it does. But actually the civilian application had a whole lot more ethics and then type of things that perhaps we wouldn't think about in any other sort of way. And then, yes, this idea of the AGI just hiding its own capability was just mindblowing. Even though we talked about artificial jerk general intelligence and we know things like Skynet and things like that, if you watch Terminator or The Matrix or any then pick another film. But actually when he sort of mentioned this idea about the artificial intelligence, recognizing that it was more intelligent than the humans, than us, and actually just trying to dumb that down just to make sure we didn't get like, switched off for that, was just next level. Here we go. Here we go. Next person up. And you're good. All set? Yeah. My name is Fair Clark. UX. Designers. So what I really enjoyed this week has been hearing the term UX used outside of software and UI. Where I come from, it's very kind of used interchangeably. And I really like that people are taking the UX approach and applying it to things like hardware and the built environment and outside of just software. And what I'm looking forward to most is honestly just more of that. Thank you, Sarah. All right, there we go. And isn't that great? It's just the different sort of interactions that people want. And so I presume Nikki is now lining people up just to we're trying to I think that's brilliant. I'm going to say from a remote perspective, I'm somewhat jealous. There's clearly so much going on and so many different things that are happening. More than one mention has been made of happy hour, multiple happy hours, which clearly I'm not taking part in. So this just gives me an extra boost. I think hopefully next year, if we're going to do this again, we need to try and do it in person rather than remote. As far as remote is, then I think the whole being in person, being able to just work with people, I think gives me an extra sense of motivation.

 

 

Yeah. I really want you to be here next year. Please be here next year. It'd be so much easier. Oh, my god. But beyond that beyond that, I mean, like, look, it's just a ton of fun. There's been so many. Good for us. It's a little different. We've been doing live streaming all day. This is not a typical HFS experience, so I have to admit, however, being able to see everyone's happy faces, like, people are just jazzed to be here and being here in person is refreshing. It feels like coming home. I think I've mentioned that a couple of times, but it's really just the sort of atmosphere here. Everyone's happy to be back. They're exchanging. I am literally watching conversations happen right in front of me where information is being exchanged and geez, it is awesome. I don't know what you talked about with the stuff that we covered here on the show this week or today. It feels like an entire week that we're sitting here live. Well, it's almost like three months worth of coverage in one day when you but no, I spoke at some length around the leadership and what crew and Karen and Susan have to say to us. And I was just dropping into Paul Salmon and the way you silly. Yeah. Do you want to jump to the floor? We have another person up here in our line here. Let me go ahead and get all ready to go. All right. Hi, I'm Selene Malua. I'm a PhD student over at George Mason. I'd say my favorite thing about today has been the really interesting series of lectures, especially the automation one I just got out of. And something I'm really looking forward to this week at the conference is actually the joint GMU UCF social event I'm organizing, which is happening tomorrow, Wednesday at 06:00 P.m.. So please stay tuned for that and really excited for the rest of the conference. Oh, man, this is great. I love hearing from Pennsylvania. A lot of these people will do anything for a sticker. I kind of wish that I'd now sent a bunch of my stickers over there as well, but there's a lot of things I wish I'd sent over, including me in a suitcase, because that would have been a lot better. All right, now have you displayed everyone is seeing you. They can't hear you, but they at least see that we're doing a live stream. So go ahead and wave to the people at the moment. Nick, I guess you're really enjoying being there in person. I am loving this. This is amazing. You can tell that we put a lot of time and effort into planning the stream and to see most of it come together until I've kind of fallen apart at the in here, gone completely off script and started getting people's thoughts from the floor. No, this has been great. I've had a lot of fun just in the first two days that we've been here, and it's just been pretty great. So I can't even comment on anything other than what we've seen today other than the people that I've talked to, and that has just been phenomenal. I do want to mention, though, there was one interview that we had today that I just loved, and I've been looking to have Jules on the show for a very long time. Jules stop by to stop by to talk about the LGBTQ plus affinity group. And that was one of my favorite conversations that we've had in a very long time. And it's not just because I'm so comfortable with jewels and I know them. It's just because that whole discussion was so informative, thought provoking, interesting, and really important. And so if anyone's listening and choosing one thing to listen to that I don't know, everyone's going to be upset about the things that we recommend anyway, so that was one of my favorites from today, along with Paul Sammon. That was another great one. Of course. They're all my favorite. They're all my favorites. Who am I kidding? They're all my favorites. What Jules had to say was brilliant, because you're right, it wasn't a George moment, but the level of honesty is the wrong word. The level of openness that they shared with us around not only of their experiences, but what they're doing and what we can do was just really insightful, really something that I hope a lot of other people take away from this. I think we could have easily talked for another hour and still not truly scratched the surface of how we can do things better, but it was a great guy. Yeah, I agree. All right, we got another one. You're going to go? Hey, my name is Jules, and I'm being blinded by the flight. My favorite thing today, I think, was a complete stranger coming up next to me and calling me by name without looking at my name tag and saying, are you going to the dei session? And I said, yeah. And they said, I am, too. And I was like, that's totally cool. So we went there together, which was really awesome. And what am I looking forward to the most? Oh, there's so many wonderful people that I'm looking forward to talking to, but I have to say, once again, I'm really looking forward to our panel on how people can beat themselves at work as much as they want to be. And so that's a dei thing, too, but that's it. And I'm looking forward to this light not being in my eyes anymore. And I hope you all have fun. And thank you so much, both of you all, for doing this great work. Thanks, Jules. We do great work. How cool is that? Oh, man, this is fun. This is fun. Let's look at what we have going on through the rest of the conference. There's a couple of Plenary sessions going on throughout the week. So obviously, today we had Captain Craig Bowman from Boeing. Tomorrow it looks like we have a management versus technical distance of senior HFE and UX practitioners. That should be fun. One we also have on Thursday Industry 5.0 on the Future of Robotics, and then on Friday HFE and Dei crossover opportunities. So those are some of the key opportunities. And we've got more, I think we've got probably about another half hour of nick basically fishing for people. That's basically what turned into that's fair. Who do you go? Hi, I'm Karen Jacobs. I'm from Boston University. I am so delighted to be here. The energy at the HSEs annual meeting. 66 is fabulous. It is wonderful to network with everybody to catch up, to see the energy in our profession. I am so looking forward to the annual business meeting that's today, later on and I encourage everyone to go and to learn about what will be going on with our society. And I'm looking forward to tomorrow the posters with fellows. The other posters I'm looking forward to also the Environmental Design and Children's issue technical meeting. So I hope you'll join us and I thank you for being here. Thank you. Alright, so yes, we were covering some of the Plenary sessions. Why don't we take a look at what is coming for this week, some of the things I think so for tomorrow Wednesday, there is sustainability and design, which is something quite close to my heart. And actually some of the contributors are people I've sort of been working with, andrew Thatcher, Gretchen Matt, so I presented a webinar on climate economics and that sort of team hosted it for me, which was brilliant. So it'd be really interesting to see that. So that's a discussion panel. Then there is what else is on later the day that sort of brings out so safety in healthcare is something I think sorry, human factors in healthcare, should I say? It's something that's really on my radar at the moment. I'm not a healthcare professional and not really involved in health care at all, but because of some of the work I've been doing, some of the interviews I've had on twelve or two and some of the things we've talked about, it became a bit of a focus around. So I'm doing it as a bit of a nice to have I think it's a bit of a hobby. So that'll be interesting to see some of them elements coming through. What else on? There's a lot of receptions and business meetings. That's generally why you're here. You're here to network. The presentations, they're great, but at the same time and that's where the information knowledge transfers. But then I don't know, it's like once you know people, then it really just accelerates and those ideas transfer in the hallways rather than the poster sessions. So is the idea around macroeconomics? So how do we fit into the climate element, but how do we do apply ergonomics at the macro level? And so that's on Thursday there was a whole session around that. And so I recommend everybody going to have a look at that. We've spoken around. There's a decision panel around being a manager and whether people need to go down the management route in order to progress their careers. So Christie, who was one of our victims, willing participants, she can talk to us about that. Lots of really good stuff for you to dip into. So seeing that Chris Reid mentioned is HFS historical black colleges and universities out which meeting. So that is a virtue of what Chris has been trying to achieve to reach out to communities that haven't necessarily been reached before with HFPS. So that'd be quite good.

 

 

Yeah, I was just going to say I got one. This is one that Rose brought up earlier. It's me and myve that one's always a favorite of mine. It's using human factors applications, using virtual reality, mixed reality virtual environments. Always fun to see because they set up a little like a Ushaped demo area where you can kind of just go around. They do like a little brief introduction, and this is on Friday, so they do a little brief introduction of sort of what the project was and what they're hoping to accomplish. And it's literally so truncated that it doesn't even scratch the surface, at least from what I remember. You go in, they kind of talk about it quickly, and then you go and check out the demos. It's pretty cool. Another discussion panel again on Friday that I think would be interesting is around one size does not fit all ethical oversight across human practices. Practices. That is something. It's still super because we like to think we're on top of it, but I think we still have a long way to go, so I think some of that will be good. Did you talk about the discussion panel on Wednesday about human robot teams, the discussion of the emergent trends? No, I missed that one. That one seems like a good talk to go to as well. Looks like that's it. That's the title. Human robot team. The discussion of emerging trends. It looks like it'll be fun. I know some of the folks on there. Okay, that'd be good. Overall, there is clearly something for everyone. There are clearly things that people want to go to and go and see. So there's an awful lot of content. Yeah, absolutely. So a lot of the discussions that we've had today around communications, around how he feels is going. There is a lot of talk discussion around how to deliver some of this stuff differently. So not just having your traditional lecture, your traditional presentation. So be interesting to see if we take a benchmark here, what we like when we're doing this, because obviously we're going to cast this now for the next forever going forward, what it's going to be like in next year after, and see the evolution of what this conference has to offer. And how it delivers it. Yes, you're right. Because with all these changes that have been talked about from everyone involved, I think it'll be an interesting you're right, it's an interesting benchmark to kind of sit here, compare where are we in three years time? In six years time, are we still going to be podcasting? Are we going to still be around? I don't know. That's the question. We didn't even talk about the future of the podcast. That's another thing that's true. I guess my final thought on this would be if this does change, then great. But actually how disappointed it would be if it didn't because we've heard some really inspiring and some really strong motivations and really strong calls to action, some drivers to make that progressive change. It would be a shame if we sat here in three or four years time saying well, they all talked about it but nothing happened. I don't think that would be the case. We both quite strongly agreed that it feels buzzed. It feels like there is something in the air that people do want to see things change, evolve. And so I hope we are coming back next year, the year after say wow, that's the difference. Yeah. I think the last thing I'll end on is just that during this coverage, we kind of opened up today with an announcement on our side and talk about burying the lead. So burying the lead, 3 hours of sleep, people I don't know. Anyway, we have an announcement. I mean, Human Factors Minute is something that we're really proud of. It's something that we've been putting together for years. We've been working on this for four years and in fact our lab has grown so much to the point where they are putting together Human Factors Minutes on a weekly basis. We are producing these things in mass and because of that we want to make sure that this information gets out there. We want people to be they know it exists and so we are making it public. The full announcement can be found on the live stream. I might insert it here. Future Nick insert it here. Yes. Let's get into the announcement. So we wanted to share this with you all because this is something exciting for us. This is something that we have actually been working on for a very, very long time. Now. If you're a long time listener to the show, you've kind of heard some of the hints being thrown around towards this and basically the announcement is this human Factors in it are traditionally Patreon only podcast is going free to the public. So what that means is that we've been sort of encouraged by some of our talks with our patrons, so it's okay by them as well as the greater Human Factors community. A lot of people have listened to these and like the stuff that we've done with them. So we're making that content openly available to the public. And why this is so important is because we have a lot of people in our lab who actually work on this stuff and we want that to be visible with more people's eyes on it. So we're excited that the general public gets to experience some of the hard work that our Digital Media Lab has worked on over the last couple of years. Many of our lab members author Human Factors Minutes as a way of enhancing their portfolios, learning about Human Factors concepts themselves. But with our current distribution, there's not really a great way to publicly point to that stuff for that record of work. So this will give them that opportunity and that's great, but we're not quite ready to launch yet. The public facing Human Factors Minute feed will launch on the fourth anniversary of the standalone podcast, which is February 28 of next year. So Market Calendars will have ten episodes at launch. After that, the public feed of Human Factors Minute will air on the 10th, the 20th, and the last day of the month each month. So you get three human factors minutes each month. And you might be asking, what does that mean for the Patreon supporters? You made the thing that they paid for free. What kind of if you're doing the math, I just did it. It's three key factors a month for the public and then four for our patrons. And so the value of the supporter only feed will not only continue to increase over time, but it will also increase relative to the general public. There will forever be an increasing sort of delta between the two on the private feed that are not available publicly. Anyway, I say all that because I'm really excited about this announcement. This is something that took a lot of convincing. Barry can attest to it. I've been kind of precious about Human Factors in it because truly, I mentioned it earlier, this is what it looks like. And so with that, we wanted to have a happy medium and I think this approach kind of does it. So I hate asking for money, truly I do. But the standalone podcast, it does keep the lights on. We hope to provide a couple additional methods of supporting the show. We are like PBS, right? So like, all the stuff comes out of pocket. There's a couple expanded options, I think, that we're going to look for going forward and not just patron. Some people don't like the platform, that's fine. What we're looking at is Patreon. You could support us at $5 or more to get this extended sort of access. You do buy me a coffee. $5 a month monthly or $50 a year yearly. And then there's also Co Phi, which again, $5 a month will get you access to that subscriber only feed. And that's it. That's the big announcement. So we're launching another public facing podcast to join our Human Factors podcast network and that's three if you're keeping track. So here. Humanfactors cast. We got twelve to the Human Factors Podcast and now Human Factors Minute publicly available Barry, what do you think of the announcements? That's amazing. I mean. I will attest to just how much work goes on in the background behind these minutes because it's not just yes. It's a minute of amazing audio that is rich with them sort of facts and elements that any Human Factor practitioner and anybody outside of the domain can learn from. But because there's such a bank of them. There's been and the patrons have really. I think. Appreciated having that available. But making that available to everybody is going to be such a fantastic resource for everybody. There's nobody I can think who wouldn't benefit from listening to this stuff. So having that going live on February 28 of next year is going to be a really staggering moment and I think we need to appreciate unknown because I know. As you say. This has been your baby. Something that you really wanted to look after and nurture and it almost feels like it's now going to go out into the even wider world because we value our patrons and the effort they put into. As you say. Keep the lights on. So to have their support as well going forward is going to be absolutely crucial to make sure that we can provide this depth of knowledge that is there. So yeah, I'm really excited about it. I think it's going to be fantastic. Yeah. If we want to nerd out for a minute, we're planned out for the private feed through 2032 and the public feed through 2040, so you have years to listen. There's a wealth of knowledge here that's coming out like this is how we planned it and it's kind of insane with that we have Human Factors Minute coming out free to the public. It will be great. I think it will be as well. It could be really exciting because we did speak about it for nine and a half hours ago. But this idea that you guys have made all of this content and the Patriots will still get their dose there and they'll always be ahead of what goes out to the general public and so there is definitely still that buy in for Patreons. Get their exclusivity. Which is going to be brilliant for them. But then the public is going to get that stuff as well at a slow rate. But I think what was frightening was the amount of content that you mentioned that we had already because if you've been listening to the podcast at all, nick is quite into his automation at the moment and he's developed a whole lot of stuff that's good. What have we got contact to? I can talk about that now that's the automation piece that I talked about a couple of weeks on the show was figuring out how to automatically drag and drop a file and have it pull a bunch of information about Human Factors in it and have it schedule it and put it in your podcast feed at the right time and interval. So that's everything I've been working on. Man, that was a couple of weeks ago. I'm so excited. I can share that now. I feel like a big business. I feel like Chris Reed after switching over his presidency. Carolyn, that's a call back to an interview we did earlier. I'm so excited. Yes, we do have contact. We have stuff what the public feed is planned out through we have stuff planned out. So, yeah, there's a lot of stuff out there. And the public feed is out through sorry. The public feed is out to 2040. Private feed is out through

 

 

2032. Oh, man. That's the first yellow I've done, though. That's pretty good. That's pretty good. We're, what, 10 hours into the stream? Yeah, I was going to say give that another 40 seconds, and then that's 10 hours of live streaming, 10 hours of nonstop like that. It's the first for me. Well, clearly. But we knew that before we started. Yeah, it's a bit of a blast. It has been a blast. And Barry, I think I'm going to wrap up. I think we've been doing this for 10 hours. I think that's enough right now. Yeah, as soon as we hit ten, then we did. I think we must have hit something for being the longest Human Factors livestream from HFPS. I think we're the only one to do that. Yes, the longest and only award winning. Award winning. Yes. All right, well, that's it for today, everyone. If you like this conference coverage episode, I'll encourage you to go listen to any of our other conference coverage. But most recently, our coverage of Human Factors health Care symposium is a good one. Comment wherever you're listening to what you think of the coverage, did our thoughts make sense? Did my babbling rambling make sense? Did we do okay with getting the people on the show? I don't know. Tell us. You know what? Yeah. Comment with all that stuff. We had a blast. Hope you did, too. For more in depth discussion, you can always join us on our discord community. We have one of those. Visit our official website. Sign up for our newsletter. Stay up to date with all the latest Factors news. You can also go to hfps.org. They've been a huge help in setting all this up and making sure this happens. If you like what you hear, you want to support the show, there's a couple of ways that you can do that. One, you can leave us a five star review. Wherever you're watching or listening right now, that's free for you to do. Two, you can tell your friends about us. We're at human factors in Economics society. I'm telling everybody I meet about the podcast. You better bet it three. If you have the financial means to do so, you can support us on Patreon. We do this as hobbyists. I'm fortunate enough that I have a flexible job. I can do this and very too. And we sit here every week and talk about Human Factors because we find it fun. If you want to support the show, make sure we can keep doing this and literally keep the lights on. I made this joke earlier, but it doesn't work in a podcast format. But the lights are off and I'm in the dark and there they are. That's what patrons do for us. So thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And speaking of thank yous, I'm going to take a huge pause in this outro to do some thank yous and tell everyone. So, first off, first and foremost, thank you to the Human Factors in Ergonomic Society for access to this event and permission to live stream, simulcast and record everything going on here today. This has been awesome. Support from them. HFPS leadership for encouraging and supporting the idea. Everyone at all levels of leadership has been super supportive of this, really dig what we're doing and think it's valuable to the community. Volunteers. We didn't have any volunteers here on site. It was on me. But thank you. We thought we might. We thought we might, but we didn't. Hemofector's Cast Digital Media Lab. You guys made this happen too. There's so much work that went on behind the scenes in order to prep and execute this live stream. I can't even tell you how much work went into this. This was a lot. Every single promo that you saw today, every single script that we went through, all the preparation, all the organizing guests and filling out their information and making sure that the questions were correct, all that was the lab. They all did a great job. Thank you so much. I want to thank our Patreon supporters because like I said, you keep the lights on. Without you, we would literally be in the dark. And I don't know if my wife would be too happy about me doing a ten hour livestream with hundreds of dollars of equipment at a conference that I probably couldn't afford if we didn't have the support. So thank you all and truly. The last one I want to thank is our listeners. Without any of you, none of this would happen. Seriously, if no one was on the other side listening, we wouldn't do this. And we see the numbers. We know how many of you there are, roughly. And many of you have come up to me today and told me what the podcast means to you. And I can't tell you how much that means to me. So thank you so much. As always, links to everything that we do. All of our socials website description of this episode, you can check it there. Mr. Barry Kirby thank you for sitting on a live stream with me for 10 hours. We've been sitting here for 10 hours. Podcasting live from HFDs. Wow. You've been my wingman, my incredible support mechanism, my therapist. Through all this, where can our listeners go and find you if they want to talk about your thoughts and opinions on the conference from afar? So if you want to hear from me and what I've been thinking about during the past 10 hours, then find me on Twitter at the Underscore K. Oh, come into some of my interviews on Twelve or Two Humanfactors podcasts at Twelve two Podcast.com. As for me, I've been your host, Nick Rome. You can find me on our discord and across social media at nick underscore Rome. Thanks again for tuning in to Human Factors Cast. There's still a couple of people left, but I'm not going to engage them. I don't want to interrupt clients transfer, or I don't want to embarrass myself. It's been a day. Anyway, until next time, everybody. It depends. We do it. We never.

 

 

Barry Kirby Profile Photo

Barry Kirby

Managing Director

A human factors practitioner, based in Wales, UK. MD of K Sharp, Fellow of the CIEHF and a bit of a gadget geek.